Padblock
My most recent official project is PadBlock. It is a research project sponsored by UNSW with the goal of applying blockchain technology to supply chain problems.
August 2017 - Present | website

divvyp
divvyup is a personal project born from my problem of needing to split grocery receipts between roommates. It parses eReceipts into itemized lists and then assigns each roommate a share of the receipt based on food they eat.
notable tech: golang, docker | source | website

doms.land
doms.land is this website! It is a simple website, hosted on a digital ocean box inside a docker container. The box runs a few of my other projects in containers, all of which are routed through nginx (reverse proxy)
notable tech: nodejs, docker, bulma | source

redox
Redox-OS is a microkernel operating system written in mozilla's rustlang. I contributed small rust fixes to some of the packages including sodium and games. My most notable contribution was a bash script to bootstrap installing all of the build dependencies - for all major linux distributions. It was my humble beginning to the open source world.
notable tech: rustlang, bash | website | my pr's

updoots

During the summer of 2017 myself and Brian Luebbert-Hill set out to write a yik yak clone for Pitt campus. Over the course of approximetly a week I wrote the backend in golang - it was my first project ever in golang. We then paired it up with an Angular2, Ionic mobile app front end. All of this was hosted on AWS. Eventually I was asked to demo the app at a Pitt Computer Science Club meeting.
api source | app source | website

GroupMe Bots
Using the GroupMe API and the Giphy API I wrote the first of many bots that my friends and I would use in our groupme group chats. The bot is hosted on heroku and is written in nodejs. After open sourcing my code other members of my group followed my template and created various other bots including a definition bot and a weather bot.
notable tech: Heroku, nodejs | source

SteelHacks
During a 24 hour hackathon myself, David Rocker, Daniel Justice, and David Hasler worked together to build a game with unity. The idea is rather simple and is best described as: "Reverse Pac Man with a Low Poly Spin". My main job was AI, I chose to use Dijkstra's to find the shortest path between the enemies and the rewards, the implementation required a combination of data structres including queues and stacks.
notable tech: Unity, C# | website | source

Simple XKCD
I always wanted to write a chrome extension, and so one day that was exactly what I did. It is a very simple extension that simply adds a button to chrome. When you click on the button a window pops up with the most recent XKCD, and underneath is that alt text. It is built with HTML and a little javascript.
Summer 2014 | webstore link | source

redox
I was a volunteer at Computer Reach for about a year. During that time I helped them refurbish computers and flash linux operating systems on them. I also assited in training the new volunteers on the inventory process. During this time I realized that the process I was teaching could be almost entirely automated. This would eliminate the need to spend as much time training people, and allow the volunteers to be more effective. I originally wrote it in python, and later re-wrote it in C++. At the time (2014) I had no formal education in computer science concepts so it is a nice reminder of how far I've come.
Summer 2013 - Winter 2014 | website | python | C++